Sleep in sports

sleep deprivation and the effect on exercise performance.

Sleep and Athletic Recovery Off the court and away from the gym, sleep also plays a critical role in helping athletes build mental strength and physically recover from training and competitive events.

Weightlifters exhibited worse athletic performance after a second night of restricted sleep than just one night, which suggests a cumulative fatigue effect. But no matter how serious you are about your sport, sleep will boost your athletic performance in several ways.

Footballers and judo athletes who experienced four fewer hours of sleep showed decreases in power during anaerobic cycling tests. One sleepless night is unlikely to hurt your performance. The quality and amount of sleep athletes get is often the key to winning. TVs and smartphones emit blue light, which suppresses the melatonin levels that make us sleepy.

Sleep and sports injuries

Mah's research is some of the first to specifically look at the impact of extra hours of sleep on athletic performance and suggests that sleep is a significant factor in achieving peak athletic performance. What are your concerns? One study she authored, published in , followed the Stanford University women's tennis team for five weeks as they attempted to get 10 hours of sleep each night. Limit the late-night lifting. Beyond the typical snoring and insomnia, athletes also must overcome additional factors that complicate sleep, including training schedules, rigorous competitions and travel. The good news for most recreational athletes is that just one sleepless night is not necessarily associated with any negative effects on performance. Sleep and Injury While intense training is most often the catalyst for sports-related injuries, lack of sleep appears to be a factor as well. How much sleep you need exactly depends on your genes and how much physical activity you channel into your sport most adults need seven to nine hours a night and athletes might improve their performance with up to 10 hours a night. Use of these devices should be limited before bed, or at a minimum, turned on night mode or dimmed. Athletes can easily fail to get regular, consistent hours of sleep. Another perk: Optimal slumber means you'll have faster reaction times and reflexes. If you fall asleep within 20 minutes of going to bed and wake up without an alarm, you are probably getting the right amount of sleep.

As clinical researchers continue to study sleep and athletic performance, there are a growing number of findings that directly correlate sleep with athletic performance. Basketball players who score an extra two hours of sleep a night boost their speed by five percent—and their accuracy by nine percent.

Please try again. Just as athletes need more calories to fuel their bodies for their sport, they also need more shut-eye: Lots of physical activity puts more demand on muscles and tissues, and the body repairs itself during slumber. Get exercise tips to make your workouts less work and more fun.

Gatorade sports science institute sleep

As clinical researchers continue to study sleep and athletic performance, there are a growing number of findings that directly correlate sleep with athletic performance. You can help your body better consolidate memories linked to motor skills simply by hitting the sack. Sleep and Injury While intense training is most often the catalyst for sports-related injuries, lack of sleep appears to be a factor as well. Take daily naps if you don't get enough sleep each night. Student athletes who sleep less than eight hours a night are two times more likely to suffer an injury within a month. But did you know that in addition to physical conditioning and conscious eating, sleep plays a major role in athletic performance and competitive results? Sleep loss can lead to potential decreases in immune system function and a reduction in the release of growth hormone, as well as the hormones leptin and adiponectin — both of which play major roles in fat gain and loss. For many athletes and coaches, this study was the first body of research that helped them truly understood how large of an impact sleep can have on performance and results. Sleep is an essential component of health and well-being, with significant impacts on physical development, emotional regulation, cognitive performance, and quality of life.

This is particularly important for collegiate and professional athletes who have full schedules and often travel for games and competitions.

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How Sleep Affects Athletes' Performance